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in federal prison. in tunisia, new protests broke out in the capital, demanding the end of the government. it was the second day of unrest sparked by the killing of a leading opposition figure. we have a report narrated by jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: in tunis today, crowds converged on the interior ministry on the same spot where the so-called arab spring began two years ago. "the people want the downfall of the regime" the chant once again. but this time the tear gas came from police loyal not to a dictator but to tunisia's democratically elected government, one which now stands accuse of complicity in political assassination. the victim was chokri belaid, shot outside his home yesterday by a gunman on a motorbike. belaid had appeared on television the night before he died. the s.e.c. tar politician told his interview that tunisia's governing islamist party harbored religious factions which incited violence. his killing prompted the biggest explosion of anger since the revolution itself. groups claiming that revolution had been stolen by islamists who w
supports basic freedoms in the arab world and will continue to work on places like egypt and tunisia so that the muslim identity of its citizens can be preserved and the democratic aspirations of its people can be realized. as far as the convoy, you know, i'm not privy to intelligence about what the convoy contained. i suspect that either included missile technology or wmd, or israel would not have felt compelled to attack the convoy across the border into syria. and that kind of preemptive action when it comes to offensive weapons or wmd. in my mind it is entirely justified and the united states would be entirely right supporting it. >> thank you, david. your remarks indicate a fastening both this is. it's a great preview to reading it. i look forward to doing exactly that. there's one issue that has been in the literature heavily debated about kosovo, and i think you're in a very good position to clarify the issue. what you've already said makes a negotiated agreement very unlikely, remarks at milosevic were not promising for a negotiated agreement. other scholars have suggested that
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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